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Wednesday, October 14
 

12:30pm

Design As Protest - All Day Session
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday October 14, 2015 12:30pm - 5:30pm
AIA New Orleans Center 1000 St. Charles Ave.

5:00pm

Legacy Project Volunteer Party
Limited Capacity seats available

Wednesday October 14, 2015 5:00pm - 7:00pm
AIA New Orleans Center 1000 St. Charles Ave.
 
Thursday, October 15
 

8:00am

Tour of New Orleans Public Spaces
Limited Capacity full

Please meet at the NOMA Registration Desk 5min before scheduled time.

The tour focuses on three urban spaces in New Orleans: Jackson Square, Congo Square
and Lafayette Square, the significant buildings in their environs and their contributions to 
New Orleans’s architectural and cultural history. Each of these spaces is of profound 
historical importance to the city. Although they are of identical size, each arose from and 
has contributed to, a completely different historic culture.
We will begin with the short walk from the lobby of the Sheraton Hotel (1) to Lafayette 
Square (2), the seat of government in the American Sector from the mid nineteenth to the 
mid twentieth century. Anchored by James Gallier’s City Hall (3), that now bears his 
name, the square is surrounded by building of institutional importance, the Fifth Circuit 
US Court of Appeals (4) and several other building of the US federal government. Also 
of note are the Lafayette Hotel (5) and recent office and mixed use buildings. From there 
we will pass by other nearby CBD places and buildings of significance, the remains of 
South Rampart St., the recent 930 Poydras (7) residential building, the Civic Center 
complex (6) including City Hall (8) and the Public Library (9), the Roosevelt Hotel (11) 
and the Orpheum Theater (10). 
The second urban public space of focus is Congo Square. Crossing Canal St. on Rampart 
we will see the rejuvenated theatres at the intersection, most notably the Saenger (12). 
Along North Rampart we will note the juxtaposition of the Modernist parking structure 
and its neoclassical neighbor, the New Orleans Athletic Club (13). A block away, we will 
discuss the only remaining twentieth century housing project, Iberville (14) and its 
proposed transformation. Crossing Rampart, we will enter Congo Square (15), a place of 
seminal importance to the history and development of African American music and 
culture. We will discuss the transformation of Congo Square over time and its current 
condition being subsumed within Louis Armstrong Park (16). 
Crossing from the Treme (17) side of Rampart into the Vieux Carre, we engage our third 
place of focus, Jackson Square (21). On the way we will proceed riverward on Dumaine 
St. (18) stopping at Madame John’s Legacy (19) one of the oldest residential buildings in 
the quarter, now open to the public by the Historic New Orleans Collection. We will 
enter the Square and discuss its vast prospect enfronting the Mississippi River. We’ll 
assess the cultural significance of the Cabildo, the Presbytere and St Louis Cathedral 
(20), from the original French settlement of the eighteenth century. We will also consider 
the role of the Pontalba buildings (22) in the urban, cultural and architectural contexts. A 
stroll up Chartres St. to the historic Napoleon House (23) completes the tour. 

Speakers
JK

John Klingman

John P. Klingman currently holds a Favrot Professorship in Architecture at Tulane University where he has been a faculty member since 1983. He has long been interested in issues of infrastructure in relation to architecture. In conjunction with the post-katrina international Dutch Dialogues initiative spearheaded by the New Orleans architectural firm Waggonner and Ball Architects, his current upper level design studio focus relates... Read More →



8:00am

8:55am

The Other Side of the Table: Leveraging your skills representing an owner
Architecture degrees provide a very versatile launching point for careers in both design and construction related industries. Recent trends have seen many graduates of Architecture going to related fields on the owner’s side, working for developers, community based organizations, or companies that manage construction in-house. This sharpens many skills not as prevalent in school such as cost estimation, drafting of scope, project management and oversight, as well as construction management and inspection.

Join a conversation from graduates of architecture that are working in program, project, and construction management. Discuss long-term career goals and job growth potential. Understand the different perspectives in respect to design and construction processes when you are a representative of the owner and the effect this has on the budget, proposal and bidding process. We will cover the creation of the budget, drafting of the RFP, review of bidding processes, logging and tracking submittals, tips to project management, the importance of quality control, and steps for project closeout. Additionally, we will cover some changes to expect when federal funding is to be considered and how energy codes and sustainable goals can factor into the project management process.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Segovia-Burke

Danielle Segovia-Burke

Assistant Project Manager, Adelhardt Construction
Danielle Segovia-Burke is currently a Assistant Project Manager at Adelhardt Construction a General Contractor and Project Management Company. At Adelhardt, she is currently working on bank branches and other interior renovations.Danielle graduated from Syracuse University in 2011 with a Bachelors of Architecture. Before Adelhardt Danielle spent the the last four years working in a design and construction department of a french bakery and at a... Read More →
avatar for Tya Winn

Tya Winn

Tya Winn, NOMA, LEED Green Associate, SEED | | Tya Winn is currently employed as a Program Manager at the Philadelphia Housing Authority in the department of Capital Projects and Development. She has focused her career working in real estate and community development focused on equity around affordable housing, economic development and urban revitalization. As an active NOMA member, Tya is the Vice President of PhilaNOMA, the Philadelphia... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 8:55am - 9:55am
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel

8:55am

What can NOMA do for me?
Limited Capacity seats available

NOMA has been around for more than 40 years. The local chapters of NOMA are crucial to the organization. The question is always asked, why should I join? What benefits do I get? The seminar will illustrate from a longtime NOMA member their personal experience and the mentorship they have given back

Speakers
BH

Bryan Hudson

Bryan Wendell Hudson is a licensed Architect in the state of Illinois. He is president and founder of SOMA Design Consultants, an architectural design and construction management firm. He specializes in Residential design small to medium, Commercial, Religious and educational. Bryan has served as Treasurer for the National Organization of Minority Architects and is the current Midwest Vice President NOMA. He is a graduate of the University of... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Thompson

Andrew Thompson

Vice President North East Region, NOMA
Andrew Thompson earned his bachelor’s degree in architecture from the Pratt Institute in 1991 and a master’s in architecture and urban design from Columbia in 1993. For almost 10 years he served as a facilities planner and architectural designer with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. He worked on projects at the World Trade Center site in the twin towers and various Port Authority facilities and then went to work on the Air Train... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 8:55am - 9:55am
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

10:00am

What NOMA Means To Me: A Panel Discussion on Student & Professional Perspectives
Limited Capacity seats available

This will be a panel discussion held by four Executive Board Members in an effort to describe the importance of upholding membership from the student to professional levels.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Simpson, AIA, LEED AP, NOMA

Andrea Simpson, AIA, LEED AP, NOMA

Project Manager, Dekalb Office Environments
Andrea is a licensed architect that has practiced architecture for 10+ years. During that time she has been fortunate to work on a wide variety of design and construction projects within all delivery phases, conceptual sketches through post-occupancy. Her project experience ranges from urban housing design developments, industrial, commercial, corporate interiors, retail, government contracts and healthcare. Since graduating from Auburn... Read More →
TA

Travis Armbrister

NOMA
My name is Travis Armbrister and I am a fourth year architecture major from Nassau, Bahamas. Currently, I am studying at the Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture at Tuskegee University and during my time there my love for architecture has grown exceedingly. In addition, I serve the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) as the elected NOMA Student Representative for the Executive Board of Directors (2014-2016 term) and I am... Read More →
avatar for Tiffany Brown

Tiffany Brown

LS Brinker Group
Born and raised in Detroit, Tiffany holds a B. Arch, an M.Arch, and an MBA from Lawrence Technological University. Tiffany was employed as an Intern Architect at Hamilton Anderson Associates for 11 years, working on a wide variety of projects in Detroit and Las Vegas, during which time she found great interest in Construction Management and Administration. This interest led Tiffany to the next chapter in her career as a Project Engineer at LS... Read More →
BH

Bryan Hudson

Bryan Wendell Hudson is a licensed Architect in the state of Illinois. He is president and founder of SOMA Design Consultants, an architectural design and construction management firm. He specializes in Residential design small to medium, Commercial, Religious and educational. Bryan has served as Treasurer for the National Organization of Minority Architects and is the current Midwest Vice President NOMA. He is a graduate of the University of... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

10:00am

Ownership Transition - Do or Die
Limited Capacity seats available

“It's inevitable...someday you will leave your firm. It is never too early to make plans for your firm's survival after your departure. Firm owners who fail to plan properly on ownership transition are leaving the firm exposed to the potential for undesirable outcomes – including significant loss of firm value, brand equity deterioration, and loss of market position.” This seminar will provide a primer for firm owners and those interested in ownership on the reasons for an ownership transition plan and means and methods of implementing a plan.

Speakers
avatar for Sanford Garner, AIA, NOMAC, LEED AP ND

Sanford Garner, AIA, NOMAC, LEED AP ND

Founding Partner / President, RG Collaborative
I love the urban cores of cities, and I'm deeply steeped and interested in social equity. Let's talk about art, architecture, economics, philosophy, psychology, preservation, you name it. I love differing opinions, and I enjoy getting to know people.
CS

Carlton Smith

Carlton is the Managing Principal of MWA Architects, a San Francisco based architecture, urban design and interior architecture firm with regional offices in Oakland California and Portland Oregon. He holds both a Bachelor of Architectural Science and Master of Architecture degree from Tuskegee Institute. He is a registered architect in California, Michigan, Texas, North Carolina, Florida and the District of Columbia. Carlton is also certified by... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 10:00am - 11:00am
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

11:10am

NOMA Conference 2015 - Lead In
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday October 15, 2015 11:10am - 12:30pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel

12:30pm

Tour of New Orleans Public Spaces
Limited Capacity full

Please meet at the NOMA Registration Desk 5min before scheduled time.

The tour focuses on three urban spaces in New Orleans: Jackson Square, Congo Square
and Lafayette Square, the significant buildings in their environs and their contributions to 
New Orleans’s architectural and cultural history. Each of these spaces is of profound 
historical importance to the city. Although they are of identical size, each arose from and 
has contributed to, a completely different historic culture.
We will begin with the short walk from the lobby of the Sheraton Hotel (1) to Lafayette 
Square (2), the seat of government in the American Sector from the mid nineteenth to the 
mid twentieth century. Anchored by James Gallier’s City Hall (3), that now bears his 
name, the square is surrounded by building of institutional importance, the Fifth Circuit 
US Court of Appeals (4) and several other building of the US federal government. Also 
of note are the Lafayette Hotel (5) and recent office and mixed use buildings. From there 
we will pass by other nearby CBD places and buildings of significance, the remains of 
South Rampart St., the recent 930 Poydras (7) residential building, the Civic Center 
complex (6) including City Hall (8) and the Public Library (9), the Roosevelt Hotel (11) 
and the Orpheum Theater (10). 
The second urban public space of focus is Congo Square. Crossing Canal St. on Rampart 
we will see the rejuvenated theatres at the intersection, most notably the Saenger (12). 
Along North Rampart we will note the juxtaposition of the Modernist parking structure 
and its neoclassical neighbor, the New Orleans Athletic Club (13). A block away, we will 
discuss the only remaining twentieth century housing project, Iberville (14) and its 
proposed transformation. Crossing Rampart, we will enter Congo Square (15), a place of 
seminal importance to the history and development of African American music and 
culture. We will discuss the transformation of Congo Square over time and its current 
condition being subsumed within Louis Armstrong Park (16). 
Crossing from the Treme (17) side of Rampart into the Vieux Carre, we engage our third 
place of focus, Jackson Square (21). On the way we will proceed riverward on Dumaine 
St. (18) stopping at Madame John’s Legacy (19) one of the oldest residential buildings in 
the quarter, now open to the public by the Historic New Orleans Collection. We will 
enter the Square and discuss its vast prospect enfronting the Mississippi River. We’ll 
assess the cultural significance of the Cabildo, the Presbytere and St Louis Cathedral 
(20), from the original French settlement of the eighteenth century. We will also consider 
the role of the Pontalba buildings (22) in the urban, cultural and architectural contexts. A 
stroll up Chartres St. to the historic Napoleon House (23) completes the tour. 

Speakers
JK

John Klingman

John P. Klingman currently holds a Favrot Professorship in Architecture at Tulane University where he has been a faculty member since 1983. He has long been interested in issues of infrastructure in relation to architecture. In conjunction with the post-katrina international Dutch Dialogues initiative spearheaded by the New Orleans architectural firm Waggonner and Ball Architects, his current upper level design studio focus relates... Read More →



  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

12:35pm

NOMA Chapter Officer Meeting
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday October 15, 2015 12:35pm - 2:10pm
06 - Nottoway Sheraton Hotel

12:35pm

NOMAS Student Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Thursday October 15, 2015 12:35pm - 2:10pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel

2:20pm

Unconscious Bias in the Workplace
Limited Capacity seats available

This program focuses on the role that bias plays in the workplace with an emphasis on understanding, identification and management. Case studies, current trends, news reports and social media are all used to highlight the difficulties that individuals bring to the table. Implicit attitudes and stereotypes are confronted and tools for overcoming bias are reviewed.

Speakers
avatar for joel avery

joel avery

Principal, CREATiVENESS
Joel Avery is Principal of CREATiVENESS, a unique design, technology and imaging consulting firm that has received honors in architectural design, graphic design, web design and photography. He graduated with his B. Arch from Andrews University and practiced in Philadelphia for six years before starting his own company. In 1999 his newly founded firm was recognized for its skills by garnering sixth place (out of 870 entries) in the... Read More →
LA

Lisset Avery

Leadership & Talent Development, CREATiVENESS
Lisset Avery is a professional educator who has been inspiring some of the world’s most influential companies towards greater excellence for the last two decades. Lockheed Martin, The Project Management Institute, Vanguard and other businesses have relied on her training & development programs to improve performance at all levels of the organization. She is currently Senior Instructional Designer for Vertex, Inc. in Berwyn, Pennsylvania. Her... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 2:20pm - 3:20pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

2:20pm

'Lifting the Veil' Documenting invisible voices in Architecture
Limited Capacity seats available

This seminar introduces the book, Space Unveiled: Invisible Cultures in the Design Studio—published in July 2014 by Routledge Research in Architecture series—as a critical tool for refocusing the cultural, historical, and pedagogical approaches in architecture and design programs to effect change in the number of underrepresented groups in the profession.  Space Unveiled is both entering a vibrant conversation in critical discourse and also adding significant contributions with 22 practicing architects and educators—connecting and unveiling cultural teaching approaches in architectural theory and seminar courses, and in design and non-design studios.  The purpose of this session is two-fold. First, to uncover invisible voices, cultures and pedagogical approaches using cognitive apprenticeship approaches (CAAs) identified by African American architects and educators in architecture education and practice. The session will also reveal cultural perspectives of women and a wide range of diverse design professionals who have experienced and taught cultural approaches that are unfortunate omissions in modern American education.

Speakers
KA

kathryn anthony

dr., university of illinois at urbana-champaign
CJ

Carla Jackson Bell

Faculty and Director, Multicultural Affairs, Auburn University
Dr. Carla Jackson Bell is currently a faculty member and the Director of Multicultural Affairs in the College of Architecture, Design and Construction (CADC) at Auburn University. She is recognized as the first and only woman architecture faculty to receive tenure in the Department of Architecture at Tuskegee University and one of only 12 tenured African American women architecture faculty in the United States. Throughout her 22 years of... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Chin

Andrew Chin

Assistant Dean, Florida A & M University
Andrew Chin is an Associate Professor and Assistant Dean of the Florida A&M University School of Architecture + Engineering Technology. Chin serves as the Director of the School’s undergraduate and graduate programs in architecture. He completed a Bachelor of Design and a Masters of Architecture from the University of Florida, urban design studies at Georgia Institute of Technology and planning at Florida State University. Since 1991, Chin... Read More →
KM

Kevin Moore

Assistant Professor, Auburn University
Kevin Moore teaches architecture and interior architecture. His research describes the creation of experiential variety over time through cross-modal sensory perception. Working on a diverse range of projects, his professional focus has been to integrate interior and exterior for renovations, additions and new buildings in urban settings.
avatar for La Barbara James Wigfall

La Barbara James Wigfall

Professor, Kansas State University, Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning
La Barbara James Wigfall, founding KSU NOMA advisor and former University Liaison/NOMA Board, focuses on consensus imagination and community empowerment. She serves on the University committee who oversees the Center design process.
DW

Daisy-O'lice Williams

Assistant Professor, University of Oregon, A&AA


Thursday October 15, 2015 2:20pm - 3:20pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

2:20pm

Design Health, Justice in the Built Environment
Limited Capacity seats available

What injustices in the built environment negatively impact health? What can designers do about it? This course will focus on environmental justice as it pertains to health. Starting with a broad brush understanding of the impacts of the built environment on human health and the correlation of some of those impacts with minority and low-income groups, the course will then take on the specifics of environmental justice issues in New Orleans. Through case studies, gathered research, and tools, the seminar will seek to illustrate lessons that could be applied in other design projects.

Speakers
avatar for Marina Michael

Marina Michael

Research Fellow, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple
Marina is the 2015-2016 Research Fellow at Eskew Dumez Ripple (EDR), a nationally recognized firm centered in New Orleans, LA. EDR hires one new researcher every year to concentrate on a particular area of interest in the built environment and feed that knowledge into the studio. The focus of this year’s fellowship is health. A 2015 graduate of the M.Arch program at the University of Virginia, Marina is passionate about how architecture can... Read More →



Thursday October 15, 2015 2:20pm - 3:20pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

2:20pm

EJ + the Design Professions: Where are we Now? Where do we need to Go
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on a key social justice issue, environmental justice. Environmental justice is about more than ‘toxic waste and race’. There is an exciting narrative that reveals environmental justice is a forward, thinking sustainable approach. Practitioners will discuss how their disciplines/careers intersect with environmental justice. Learn how stewards of the built environment (planners; designers; landscape architects; etc.) are advancing environmental justice as well as making a visible difference within communities.

Speakers
KB

Kofi Boone

Associate Professor, NCSU College of Design
Kofi Boone is an Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at NC State University, College of Design. He is a Faculty Fellow of the Institute for Emerging Issues, a member of the Academy of Outstanding Teachers, and serves as Co-Director of the College of Design’s Ghana Study Abroad Program. Through scholarship, teaching, and extension service Professor Boone works in the landscape context of environmental justice. His works emphasizes... Read More →
avatar for Carlton Eley

Carlton Eley

Senior Environmental Protection Specialist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Carlton Eley is an environmentalist, urban planner, and lecturer. He has ten years experience advancing projects targeting environmental justice and sustainable urban policy, and he is EPA’s leading expert on the topic of equitable development. Carlton is credited for elevating equitable development to the level of formal recognition within U.S. EPA as an approach for encouraging sustainable communities. He has coordinated national competitions... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Williams

Katherine Williams

Katherine Williams is a licensed architect in Virginia. She was formerly a Project Manager and Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow at the San Francisco Housing Development Corporation. She has served in numerous positions including the AIA Housing Knowledge Community advisory group, editing the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) magazine, and on several non-profit boards. Katherine graduated from Howard University. She is a... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 2:20pm - 3:50pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

3:25pm

3:25pm

Twin Forks Rising - A Plan to Live with Water
Limited Capacity seats available

During Segregation, the Twin Forks area of Hattiesburg, MS, also known as Ward 2, was well known as a culturally rich and vibrant area with a thriving African-American commercial district. The area consequently served a key role during the Civil Rights Movement, especially during Freedom Summer. However the area’s high flood risk, especially after the flood of 1983, contributed to the area’s physical, social and economic deterioration. The Twin Forks Rising Master Plan establishes a development framework to mitigate chronic flooding and drainage problems and the resulting economic depression and blight. The plan creates a series of water features, based on the Dutch philosophy of embracing flood waters, that serve the dual purpose of water storage at times of rising waters and as attractive public amenities and placemaking elements to spur economic growth in depressed neighborhoods. Other placemaking strategies used include targeting historically significant neighborhood areas for redevelopment as pedestrian friendly, mixed-use centers.

Speakers

Thursday October 15, 2015 3:25pm - 4:25pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

3:25pm

Whose City Is it Anyway? Gender, Violence, and Public Space
Limited Capacity seats available

In the United States, 85% of women report being sexually harassed on the street before the age of 18. Street harassment caused 70% of women to change their commute or avoid certain areas or neighborhoods. Harassment and sexual violence is an every-day threat for women, even more so for women of color and members of the LGBTQ community. What is street harassment? What is gendered space anyways? What can designers do to address safety concerns of victims? This seminar discusses how street harassment affects use of and access to public space, discusses engagement techniques that designers and urban planners can use to understand and address theses issues in their community, and discusses examples of cities and projects that have tackled un-gendering public space through design.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Smith-Torres

Vanessa Smith-Torres

Eskew+Dumez+Ripple / Hollaback! New Orleans
Vanessa is and New Orleans architect and activist. She is the Site Director and Co-Funder of Hollaback! New Orleans. Hollaback! is a movement to end street harassment powered by a network of local activists around the world. Sites work together to better understand street harassment, to ignite public conversations, and to develop innovative strategies to ensure equal access to public spaces. | | A member of the National Organization of... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 3:25pm - 4:55pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel

4:30pm

The African American Churches of Central City New Orleans
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
DJ

Dr. Jill Bambury

Associate Professor, Southern University School of Architecture, Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge
Jill Bambury received her PhD in the History and Philosophy of Architecture from the University of Cambridge in 2015, where she was awarded scholarships from the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Jill’s research on African American Churches is inspired by her students and community at Southern University School of Architecture, a Historically Black University in Baton Rouge... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 4:30pm - 5:30pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

4:30pm

Vortex: African-American Women Architects in Practice
Limited Capacity seats available

Vortex has been the catalyst for much of the recent increase in the number of African American Women licensed to practice architecture in recent years. This session will provide a glimpse of the profession through the eyes of practitioners from a wide range of practice environments. This session will investigate the recent achievements of African American women and other minority women in architecture and their impact on the broader environment. The session will also highlight the positive impacts resulting from increased gender and cultural diversity within architecture firms.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Dixon

Kathy Dixon

Principal, K. Dixon Architecture, PLLC
Ms. Dixon is a licensed architect with more than 22 years of experience involving various building types and facilities. She has been involved in every stage of the construction process and has experience in educational, commercial, residential and government projects. A graduate of Howard University’s School of Architecture, Ms. Dixon continued her secondary education at UCLA, matriculating with a Master’s degree in Urban Planning, with a... Read More →
NM

Nea Maloo

Nea Maloo is educator and practicing Architect. Teaching helps the practice and brings innovation in all designs and construction. The firm prides themselves in doing all exterior and interior works to all the projects. | | As Chief Designer, Nea inspires her project teams with a strong commitment to thoughtful modern architecture that explores spatial, material and visual experience. After careful examination of the unique characteristics... Read More →
avatar for Katherine Williams

Katherine Williams

Katherine Williams is a licensed architect in Virginia. She was formerly a Project Manager and Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow at the San Francisco Housing Development Corporation. She has served in numerous positions including the AIA Housing Knowledge Community advisory group, editing the National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) magazine, and on several non-profit boards. Katherine graduated from Howard University. She is a... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 4:30pm - 6:00pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

4:30pm

Learning Space Design for the Ethnically Diverse Undergraduate Classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Americans under the age of 18 will be majority non-white by 2018. This demographic already exists in 10 states plus the District of Columbia. But ethnically diverse classes have never been the subject of learning space research, until now. Our study examines, will a change in student demographic impact the socialized community of learners that is the essence of the undergraduate active learning classroom? This session will present findings from ground breaking research, funded by an AIA Upjohn research grant. It will provide evidence for the design of the next generation of learning spaces that will improve the performance of the future ethnically diverse American classroom.

Speakers
MA

Mary Anne Akers

Dean and Professor, Morgan State University
Mary Anne Alabanza Akers is Dean and Professor of the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University. She received a Ph.D. in Social Science-Urban Planning from Michigan State University | In 1991. Dr. Akers’ research focuses on the impact of the built environment on street vendors, college students, homeless people, and other populations, as well as the cultural and social aspects of design. | She has over 50 publications... Read More →
CH

Christine Hohmann

Christine Hohmann is a developmental neuroscientist (Morgan State University), who received her Ph.D. from Brown University in Neuroscience in 1985 and completed her postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, where she subsequently was appointed as Assistant Professor. Since 1993, Dr. Hohmann has served on the faculty of the Biology Department at Morgan State University (MSU). Her research focuses on the development of... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 4:30pm - 6:00pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel

5:00pm

Public Interest Design: Case Studies from Academia
Limited Capacity seats available

This article discusses pedagogical experiences and lessons learned from two public interest design projects accomplished in a design class at the University of Minnesota. Students gained disciplinary and civic benefits while problem solving for the calming room design for Bruce Vento elementary school in inner city St Paul and the mobile TV set for the Imprisoned Show dedicated to advocating for victims of human trafficking with the show producer in Minnesota. The author presents findings and hopes the article will serve as a model for designers and educators interested in community engagement. Overall, these pedagogical experiences illustrate numerous disciplinary and civic benefits of public interest design such as the opportunity to connect with community within the curriculum, application of design knowledge, empathy and the opportunity for reflection. The experience enriched students’ learning and offered them some practical experience of problem solving and critical thinking in real life settings. Students also gained hands-on experience in real life settings.

Speakers
avatar for Abimbola Asojo

Abimbola Asojo

Professor, University of Minnesota
Dr. Abimbola O. Asojo is a Professor at the Department of Design, Housing and Apparel at the University of Minnesota. She holds a Doctorate from University of Oklahoma. She holds a Masters in Architecture: Computing and Design from University of East London, England and Masters and Bachelors in Architecture from Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria. Her teaching areas are lighting design; architecture design and human factors; computer modeling... Read More →


Thursday October 15, 2015 5:00pm - 6:00pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

7:00pm

Host Chapter Party
Limited Capacity seats available

Join us at the newly renovated Historic Mytle Banks Building! Bus transportation will be available from the Sheraton to the event, starting at 6:30 PM and running every 30 minutes.

When arriving at the building, walk around to the right side of the building and enter through the side door. There will be an elevator to take you to the third floor. 

Thursday October 15, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Myrtle Banks 1307 OC Haley Blvd
 
Friday, October 16
 

7:30am

Keynote Breakfast
Plated breakfast to be served from 7:30-8:30. Breakfast will only be served during this time. Please be on time

Friday October 16, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
TBA

8:00am

8:30am

Breakfast Keynote - Rosa Sheng (NOMA Annual Meeting)
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Rosa Sheng

Rosa Sheng

As a licensed architect at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson with 21 years of experience in Architecture and Design, Rosa has led a variety of award-winning and internationally acclaimed projects, from the aesthetically minimal, highly technical development of the glass structures for Apple’s original high-profile retail stores, to the innovative and sustainable LEED NC Gold–certified Lorry I. Lokey Graduate School of Business at Mills College in... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Armstrong Ballroom Sheraton Hotel

10:00am

Expo/Grad Fair Open House
Limited Capacity seats available

10:25am

3D Visualization in Architecture
Limited Capacity seats available

3D Visualization is a passion (and profession) of both speakers, so they would like to share that with the world.

Attendees should expect to learn about every MAJOR aspect of 3D rendering, visualization, and illustration as it pertains to the ARCHITECTURE industry.

Speakers will hold a Q&A session for 10-15 minutes of the presentation, so come with your questions!

SEE YOU THERE!



(general understanding of 3d visualization in architecture // 
The seminar helps you understand the overall aspect of architectural visualization as a whole. Culture and community is shown through visualization. Learning how to represent ideas visually is how architecture thrives.

As technology improves, the quality of visualization in the architecture industry improves. Clients and investors are enticed by the representation of an idea.

Using visualization is also a sustainable practice, as it is part of the design process -- it saves time and money on design phases, allowing practical ideas to be tested visually before construction.)

Speakers
avatar for Azeez Bakare

Azeez Bakare

Founder & CEO, Azeez Bakare Studios LLC
Azeez Bakare is a visualization specialist with a background in Architecture and Photography. Bakare received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture from The Ohio State University, along with a minor in Visual Communication Design. In 2013, he ran the visualization department at HOK in Washington, DC. More recently, he was hired out of 200 as a CGI Designer, with emmy-award winning studio, DBOX. Now he runs his own visualization and... Read More →
MF

Michael Ford

Madison College
Michael Ford is a designer, born and raised in the city of Detroit. Ford received his Masters of Architecture degree from the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), where he completed his graduate thesis titled “Hip Hop Inspired Architecture and Design.” He has worked as a designer at Hamilton Anderson Associates located in Detroit, Mich. and as an adjunct professor at his alma matter. Ford has also worked as a designer at Flad Architects located... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 10:25am - 11:25am
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

10:25am

The 9/11 Museum: Memory, Authenticity, Scale and Emotion
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you design a museum on an iconic site that pays homage to a tragic event, while respecting the feelings and memories of survivors, family members, and residents? In this session, we'll revisit the emotionally charged rebuilding at Ground Zero of the 9/11 tragedy.

Join us to explore the issues and processes surrounding design of the 9/11 Memorial Museum:

• Legal requirements to preserve public access to many of the surviving in-situ artifacts of the World Trade Center site, including the foundations of the Twin Towers, the slurry wall, and the "survivors' stairs"
• Means of integrating exhibit content and narrative into architectural form
• Collaboration with family members, survivors, preservationists, community residents, scholars, and curators
• The Section 106 Process for accessing and preserving historic resources

By examining this case study, you'll gain insights into how design and architecture can help resolve conflict, appease stakeholders, and bring peace to a community.

Speakers
CK

Carl Krebs

Partner, Davis Brody Bond
Carl Krebs’ work at Davis Brody Bond for over two decades has focused on cultural, civic and academic projects. Mr. Krebs served as the co-designer of the National September 11 Memorial Museum which opened to the public in May 2014. During the ten years of planning, design and construction of the Museum, he led the design team’s outreach to the community; including engagement with public agencies, local officials, preservation advocates... Read More →
MW

Mark Wagner

Associate Partner, Davis Brody Bond, LLP
Mark Wagner has extensive experience in the design of cultural projects. As Project Architect for the National September 11 Memorial Museum he oversaw the Museum’s design and construction, navigating many building challenges due to the complexity of the numerous integrated construction projects at the World Trade Center site. Mr. Wagner’s familiarity with the site dates back to his role as Project Architect for the World Trade Center Archive... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 10:25am - 11:25am
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

10:25am

Design for Equity: Defining outcomes
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop will use dialog from the Equity Collective and Design for Equity article series (http://www.designforequity.org/articles.html) as a starting point, but looks to expand the conversation with all participants, and speak critically about how to elevate the community-engaged design field.

In small topical groups, an open and candid discussion relating to the Design for Equity framework posed by the facilitators will create an opportunity for all participants to enhance and share in this important conversation. This will also be a time to reflect on personal practices and an opportunity to leverage all the expertise in the room to move everyone’s work forward.

The workshop will close with a visioning activity to define concrete next steps towards a Theory of Change, as a way to build a more unified movement and think about tactics and strategies that can move equity outcomes to the forefront of all Community Design practices, projects, and processes.

Desired Outcomes:
Open up conversation and create collective definitions
Push the field towards action to move the field forward
Workshop and provide support around specific work/terms, expanding the base of the work
Advance the pathway or Theory of Change

Speakers
avatar for Theresa Hwang

Theresa Hwang

Theresa Hwang is the Director of Community Design and Planning at the Skid Row Housing Trust, a non-profit permanent supportive housing organization where she was the Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow from 2009-2012. She has spent over 10 years engaged in community organizing work for equitable cultural development and community empowerment with multiple groups and campaigns in Boston and Los Angeles. She implements community organizing... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Joslin

Nicole Joslin

Development Manager, Austin Community Design & Development Center
After working for Architecture for Humanity on a Hurricane Katrina recovery program in Biloxi, MS, Nicole moved to Austin and co-founded Women.Design.Build to provide more opportunities for women to engage in community driven design and construction activities. She concurrently worked for the architecture firm BOKA Powell on local mixed-use developments and received her architectural license in 2012. Her background in architecture, development... Read More →
avatar for Liz Ogbu

Liz Ogbu

Founder + Principal, Studio O
Liz Ogbu is a designer, urbanist, and social innovator. From designing shelters for immigrant day laborers in the U.S. to leading a design workshop at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting, Liz has a long history of engagement in the design for social impact movement. She is Founder + Principal of Studio O, a multidisciplinary consulting practice that works with nonprofits, municipalities, and companies to tackle wicked social problems... Read More →
avatar for Jess Zimbabwe

Jess Zimbabwe

Director of Urban Development & Executive Director of the Rose Center, National League of Cities/Urban Land Institute
Jess Zimbabwe serves as founding Executive Director of the Daniel Rose Center for Public Leadership at the National League of Cities and the Urban Land Institute. Previously, Jess was the Director of the Mayors’ Institute on City Design and served as the Community Design Director at Urban Ecology, providing pro bono community planning and design assistance to low-income neighborhoods in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is a licensed architect... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 10:25am - 11:55am
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

10:25am

The Cultural Interpretation of Cities
Limited Capacity seats available

Renee Kemp Rotan, urban designer is interested in the comparative, cross-cultural, and inter-disciplinary understanding of urban culture--not as the static legacy of the past--but rather as a dynamic projection of cultural interpretations that challenge convention to establish future expressions and directives for community development. This lecture explores the gaps, challenges, strategies to advance the burgeoning field of socially responsible design through the examples of the Railroad Reservation Park, The Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail, the African American community of Rosedale, Fort Worth Texas; Auburn Avenue Civil Rights Street Museum, her international design competition submission for the Cairo Museum and her curatorial debut The Freedom Exhibition and the Power of Place: The Comparative Civil Rights Photography of Spider Martin and Peter Magubane, Segregation in the American South and Apartheid in South Africa. As a well-advanced interdisciplinary planning strategist, Kemp-Rotan will focus on urban design, public improvements, community development; and the cultural interpretation of cities that lead to establishing public/private investment and dollars for national redevelopment models at the neighborhood scale.

Speakers
RK

Renee Kemp-Rotan

Renee Kemp Rotan, Urban Designer has served numerous US mayors. Birmingham: Director of Grants and Special Projects; Former: Director, Capital Projects, including $175 million in bond issues for city construction; Director, Master Planning for $50 million Railroad Reservation Park, $90 million Crossplex: New Fair Park Olympic Village for Children; and $1 million Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail. Atlanta: Director... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 10:25am - 11:55am
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

11:30am

How to Use Houzz To Build Your Business
Limited Capacity seats available

How-to Houzz Session Description:
For home professionals, technology tools extend far beyond space planning and drafting. Today, technology is used to communicate more effectively with clients and to tell engaging stories about you and your portfolio of work. Technology helps you market your business with scale and efficiency, both in the office and on the go. During this session, discover how you can harness Houzz and integrated technologies to do just this: improve business efficiency, reach new prospective clients, and streamline communication.

Four learning objectives
1. Discover ways to streamline communication with clients throughout a project.
2. Learn how to build a compelling online presence in addition to best practices for engaging with an online community.
3. Learn how technology can facilitate storytelling that differentiates your business and protects your reputation.
4. Understand how these activities generate new business, and how to measure their effectiveness.

Speakers
LG

Lauren Gold

Lauren Gold is part of the Industry Marketing Team at Houzz, the largest residential design platform and community. She is a brand strategist, product manager and digital journalist, who most recently worked with Fortune 500 companies in Chicago to increase their sales on mobile devices and in the digital space. An artist herself, Lauren loves that Houzz merges her passion for technological communication with creativity and design. Lauren... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

11:30am

A Performance-Driven Practice - What it Takes to Get There
Limited Capacity seats available

Having a passion for sustainable and high performance architecture isn’t enough to implement it meaningfully into practice. It takes a redefinition of the way firms think about design, how they structure project teams, and how they implement new technologies and tools at every stage of the design process. This session will provide guidance on creating frameworks that encourage performance based design and sustainable architecture in practice. These frameworks will cover initiatives that have an impact across an entire practice and firm-wide culture, versus just focusing on projects that have sustainability-minded clients. Implementation case studies from Eskew+Dumez+Ripple—a New Orleans-based, design-first practice and AIA Firm of the Year recipient in 2014—will be presented to show how these frameworks can be applied in practice.

Speakers
JD

Jacob Dunn

Jacob Dunn grew up in the Boise, Idaho in the Pacific Northwest (ASHRAE Climate Zone 5B) before recently moving to his new home in New Orleans (ASHRAE Climate Zone 2A). He holds a Master's Degree in Architecture from the University of Idaho and his professional background has pivoted between research, sustainability consulting, education, and architecture. After working for about a year in London for ARUP's Foresight Innovation and Incubation... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

12:00pm

Collaborative Action: Designing with Community
Limited Capacity seats available

While many community design projects may never leave the drawing board, Collaborative Actions replace the drawing board with a “design by doing” approach. In this way, the guesswork of creating community events and amenities is replaced with a model that, by design, ensures more active participation. The heart of the Collaborative Action approach is to move beyond planning and dialog and into implementation.

Because the Collaborative Action emphasizes process, designers and community members are encouraged to see it as a prototype, and potentially the first step in a larger transformation. Through deep participation at all stages of planning and execution, we focused on the potential for collaborative action to sow seeds of love and forgiveness in a community. This definition of success gave designers and community members the freedom to dream, learn, and reflect. Collaborative Actions can range from arts and cultural events to comprehensive community planning strategies. Freed from the imperative for direct quantitative impact, but still motivated by a vision for social equity, the Collaborative Actions present a model for scalable community design work that does not result in failure of great ambition.

This workshop will offer a brief overview of several collaborative action projects as well as reflections on lessons learned and an interactive component on visioning and strategies for possible collaborative actions that conference participants might want to bring to their own communities.

Speakers
NY

Nella Young

Nella Young directs the Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellowship program, which places early-career architectural designers at community development organizations to contribute their design and community engagement skills to the field of the community development and affordable housing. She has a background in experiential education and urban planning. Nella holds a B.A. in Studio Arts from Wesleyan University and an M.A. in Urban and... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 12:00pm - 1:30pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

12:00pm

Grad School Panel
Limited Capacity seats available

Friday October 16, 2015 12:00pm - 1:30pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel

12:35pm

12:35pm

Design to Construction - Chicago ACE Student Design Build Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2010, ACE Chicago and CPS launched a highly successful Design-Build program; a summer studio providing hands-on experience working with a real client on a real project for Chicago high school students. The program introduces our students to a real world design problem and asks them to respond with a creative design solution. And then we build it!

The annual summer workshop is free to ACE students, who also receive a college/university scholarship at the end of the program. It is a exciting and challenging opportunity for students who have completed one year of the ACE after-school program. Our summer studio is a valuable extension of the ACE Program, providing additional mentorship and career exposure to our most motivated students. The Design Build Workshop is a unique summer apprenticeship program that immerses students in a 7-week hands-on community design project. The student team of up to 15 high-school students and 2 or more college students will be led by working and licensed professionals in Architecture, Engineering and Construction Management. Over the course of the program the students will engage with a real client, a real design problem and real budget, and will be asked to think critically and to express creative design solutions. The summer begins with a community design event in late June, and culminates in August with a final student presentation and ribbon cutting, unveiling the built project!

This seminar will be an overview of the last few several projects and teams.

Speakers
JP

Jason Pugh

Associate
Despite a diverse educational base and professional resume as an Architect and Urban Planner, Jason considers himself first and foremost a designer. He is constantly exploring new methodologies, technical and abstract, that will lead him towards creating stronger designs and solutions at multiple scales. With his communicative skills coupled with the graphic skill sets he has acquired through the use of various visual and software media... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 12:35pm - 1:35pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

1:30pm

French Quarter Walking History Tour
Limited Capacity full

The French Quarter is most enjoyable when walking in a small intimate group.  On the French Quarter Walking Tour, we will soak in the history, architecture, and culture of America’s most foreign city.  Highlights include Jackson Square, St. Louis Cathedral, Madame John’s Legacy, the Old Ursulines Convent, and the Lalaurie Mansion.

Tour meets in the Sheraton Lobby and ends at Jackson Square
Tour by La Vie Orleans Tours 

1:45pm

Native American Identity and Architecture: The Pursuit of Respect
Limited Capacity seats available

The struggle for recognition and identity of architects of color is a fight to discover, legitimize and incorporate history and culture. It is a painful fact that although Native Americans are the original people of the United States and the first master builders in this continent, their recognition as architects has been the slowest of all ethnic and racial groups. The first Native American architect was not registered until 1970. This presentation brings together the first Native American woman to gain registration, Tammy Eagle Bull, who was licensed in 1994 and Rod Henmi, prominent Asian American architect and NOMA board member.

Since 2002 Ms. Eagle Bull has run her own firm, Encompass Architects in Lincoln, Nebraska and will share personal stories of beginnings, inspirations and how she works with Native American clients. She strives to understand and express their cultural values and make them central to her designs. She also designs in the sustainable manner that has always characterized her people. Mr. Henmi will explore issues of cultural expression in design and the relationship of Native American design process and practice to that of other cultures and races. The struggle of Native Americans to find legitimacy and define architectural identity is the struggle of all people of color and this presentation highlights the process.

Speakers
avatar for Tammy Eagle Bull

Tammy Eagle Bull

President, Encompass Architects, p.c.
In 2002 Tammy co-founded Encompass Architects, p.c., a national firm headquartered in Lincoln, Nebraska. Encompass Architects is a Native American – Woman owned business offering full service architectural services to clients across the nation. Tammy strives to understand and express the cultural values of her clients in the communities that she designs. She received a Bachelor of Science in Design – Architectural Studies from Arizona State... Read More →
RH

Rod Henmi

Director of Design, HKIT Architects
Rod Henmi has focused his architectural career on community-oriented work such as affordable housing, schools and public buildings. He is the Director of Design at HKIT Architects after fourteen years with MWA Architects as principal and design director. Throughout his career he has been committed to social justice in architecture and has lectured on the importance of diversity and the history and role of minority architects. This presentation... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

1:45pm

The Digital Vernacular
Limited Capacity seats available

For much of history, architecture and design have existed as regional professions with most architects working locally; fewer working nationally and only an elite working globally. In the past decades, this landscape has been altered with information technology enabling an increasing number of firms to conduct international projects outside of their cultural context. Further, the incorporation of digital fabrication and parametric design software into professional workflows is rapidly changing the profession of architecture and design. In contrast, the vernacular landscape in all cultures has evolved slowly and is limited by local knowledge, materials and tools. Given the recent evolution and democratization of technology in design and construction, students and architects must reexamine what constitutes the vernacular and how these new technologies impact social and cultural contexts.

As chronicled by James Stevens (presenter) and Ralph Nelson in their book: Digital Vernacular, Architectural Principles Tools and Process (Routledge 2015), the makeLab at Lawrence Technological University has developed the idea of the Digital Vernacular. The process is created by producing Digital Design and Fabrication tools that can be made, maintained and used by laypersons using open-source technology. The effective use of technology by the makeLab is demonstrated in multiple projects in vastly different cultures. This was done in a collaborative and sensitive manner so as to not conflict with the continuity of craft traditions and the sustainable relationships that have developed between craft processes and their environmental and social contexts. The proposed makeLab Seminar is intended to address the opportunities embedded in both the vernacular and the digital. This requires a collaborative effort, bringing people of diverse backgrounds to come together and work towards revival and re-engagement with the craft sector. The seminar will seek to leverage traditional craft with parametric and digital fabrication tools.

Learning Objectives

•Understand the relationship of digital craft and social context
•Identify the ethical implications of digital making in cultural contexts
•Examine the globalized Maker-Movement
•Critically debate the potentials of Computer Numeric Controlled machining (CNC), Laser cutting and additive (3D printing) technologies.

Speakers

Friday October 16, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

1:45pm

Landscape Resilience and Changing Place
Limited Capacity seats available

Both Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy resulted in floods that redefined our understanding of places we love. Recovery efforts in the northeast have borrowed heavily from the Gulf region’s rebuilding examples; as in New Orleans and elsewhere, evolving construction standards for resilience are reshaping ideas of neighborhoods in ways not fully anticipated. This seminar/workshop will highlight an often-overlooked part of the resilience puzzle – today’s cultural landscape as it is redefined by technical responses to climate change, and will raise for consideration the steps needed to maintain a sense of place at ground level.

Speakers
EJ

Elizabeth J Kennedy

Principal, Elizabeth Kennedy Landscape Architect, PLLC
EKLA PLLC’s founder Elizabeth Kennedy draws on her diverse background in environmental psychology, landscape architecture, teaching and construction to lead her firm. A working principal, she is actively involved in all aspects of project development. The New York City Art Commission, New York Landmarks Conservancy, Preservation League of New York, US EPA, National Organization of Minority Architects, NY AIA, and others have recognized EKLA... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 1:45pm - 2:45pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

1:45pm

Case studies of community engagement and social justice through the design process
Limited Capacity seats available

This seminar will share the professional and research experience of Black landscape architecture practitioners and educators through community participatory design. Through the presentation of in-depth case studies, seminar participants will gain awareness of the range of issues, opportunities, and tools used to work with communities on design and planning challenges in the context of social and environmental justice .

Speakers
CB

C.L. Bohannon

Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech
C.L. Bohannon, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Virginia Tech. He is an Emerging Engagement Scholar designated by the Engaged Scholarship Consortium. Dr. Bohannon’s teaching and scholarship emphasizes the collaborative nature of working with communities to address self identified needs through the lens of community engagement. His works focus on social identity and place, social justice, landscape literacy and food... Read More →
KB

Kofi Boone

Associate Professor, NCSU College of Design
Kofi Boone is an Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at NC State University, College of Design. He is a Faculty Fellow of the Institute for Emerging Issues, a member of the Academy of Outstanding Teachers, and serves as Co-Director of the College of Design’s Ghana Study Abroad Program. Through scholarship, teaching, and extension service Professor Boone works in the landscape context of environmental justice. His works emphasizes... Read More →
avatar for charles cross

charles cross

Director of Landscape Architecture, Detroit Collaborative Design Center
Charles Cross, ASLA, is the Director of Landscape Architecture at the Detroit Collaborative Design Center; as well as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. He was awarded the Certificate of Merit by the American Society of Landscape Architects New York City Chapter in 2002, and received the Most Supportive Faculty Member award in 2015 from the American Institute of Architecture Students. With a commitment... Read More →
DW

Douglas Williams

I was raised in Chicago, Illinois where the city’s motto: “City in a garden” was championed in the neighborhood of my youth. Little did I know I would go on to find my path among the professions that stewards the built environment of the outdoors. Locally and internationally, my work experience has included public and private sector design practice and education. One of my most enjoyed experiences was designing a memorial garden for the... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel

2:55pm

re- DENBY: A Secondary Architectural Eductation
Limited Capacity seats available

We look to present the program, outcomes and methodology employed in a secondary architectural education program launched by Lawrence Technological University in partnership with Detroit Future City, the Education Achievement Authority of Michigan and other local partnerships. This program, housed at Edwin Denby High School of Detroit’s northeast community, focuses on teaching students architectural values in order to empower them to become active members of their local community. The Denby neighborhood deals with issues ranging from vacancy, blight, crime, poverty, etc. It is with this in mind that the program takes a local focus; requiring students to actively address these issues from a social, political and economic point of view. This seminar presentation will cover general syllabus/ project outlines, teaching methodologies, community engagement and student work (presented by a Denby student). Finally we will look at this partnership’s progress and outcomes since its inception in February 2014, in order to share lessons learned.

Speakers
AG

Amy Green- Deines

Dean, College of Architecture and Design, Lawrence Technological University
Amy Green Deines, AIA Assoc. IIDA Associate Dean, College of Architecture and Design Executive Director, Detroit Center of Design and Technology Professor at Lawrence Technological University
KL

Kristin Lusk

Lawrence Technological University, Masters Candidate of Urban Design | | IIDA General Member | | Program Development, LTU+ Denby
CS

Christopher Stefani

Lawrence Technological, University Masters Candidate of Arch. | | SEED Certified | | Program Development, LTU + Denby


Friday October 16, 2015 2:55pm - 3:55pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

2:55pm

Striving for Housing Justice
Limited Capacity seats available

Design and Development Strategies for Creating Well Designed, Healthy and Affordable Housing

Design has the capacity to help create a healthier, equitable and just world. This seminar will focus on both the design and the development of high quality affordable green housing. The speakers will examine the relationship between creating well designed green housing, the health benefits and strategies for securing the funding to achieve these goals.

Increasingly, affordable housing funding goes to projects that demonstrate highly sustainable planning strategies such as green buildings, quality urban design, transportation choices, and community benefits.
There is a need for architects to have a greater understanding of the integrated strategies that are required to both design and assist their clients with funding the development of this building type.

The Affordable Housing Design Advisor describes providing affordable housing as different from most other forms of real estate development. “The process typically involves community and resident participation in ways that for-profit developments may not. It can also be highly politicized, especially if NIMBY (“not in my back yard”) attitudes are present. Sites can also be problematic. Regulations can be tortuous. And budgets are always too low.”

Examples from real-world projects will be used to illustrate the specific understanding and special skills required by a design team to create well designed, healthy and affordable housing.

Speakers
TB

Tim Bolding

Tim Bolding has over 30 years of experience in affordable housing. Tim Bolding is the founding Executive director of United Housing, Inc. (UHI). United Housing is a nonprofit affordable housing agency that serves the City of Memphis, Shelby County, and West Tennessee. UHI targets its services to families that are under served by the traditional homeownership industry. During his tenure at UHI, the organization has grown from a department of the... Read More →
avatar for Jimmie Tucker

Jimmie Tucker

Managing Principal, Self +Tucker Architects
Jimmie Tucker has passionately combined a distinguished career as an architect, educator and community development advocate. He is an award-winning planner and designer. The team led by Jimmie recently received a highly competitive Our Town Grant to do research and further develop the Master Plan for the Memphis Heritage Trail. Jimmie is Managing Principal and Co-Founder of Self + Tucker Architects, as well as, an Adjunct Instructor of... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 2:55pm - 3:55pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

2:55pm

NCARB-Designing Your Future
Limited Capacity seats available

Join Martin Smith, AIA, NCARB, LEED Green Assoc. for a presentation about your career in architecture, licensure and beyond.

Topics will include:
• The entities involved in the licensure process
• How to progress successfully through the Intern Development Program (IDP)
• Brief overview of the Architect Registration Examination (ARE)
• The value of the NCARB Certificate
• Recent changes to NCARB programs

The presentation will also cover tips to making a successful transition from school to work and pursuing licensure once employed. Following the presentation there will be a question and answer session.

Speakers

Friday October 16, 2015 2:55pm - 4:25pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

4:00pm

The People as Genius Loci : Counter-Gentrification tactics after the storm
Limited Capacity filling up

The People as Genius Loci : Counter-Gentrification tactics after the storm

September 2015 marks the ten year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, one of New Orleans most traumatic experiences in recent history. It was traumatic not only due to the epic failure of the city’s infrastructure but also of the city’s and the nation’s inability to address race and culture. This is a city that was in physical and cultural crisis prior to Katrina and continues to be to this day. This paper is a narrative, a personal account, of my experience as an African-American designer and scholar who at once sought to assist in the further recovery of New Orleans but also be immersed in the historic mythologized African-American culture and the greatly maligned (in media) contemporary African-American culture; finding they are two parts of one continuum and “ain’t nothing really changed” over these many years. The recovery from Hurricane Katrina has made apparent the consistent dislocation between the agendas of large governmental and private developer’s ideas of what to do within predominantly African-American areas and what the citizens of these communities want and need. I will discuss a series of small grassroots projects (two in which I was directly involved) as examples of successful community organization lead initiatives that act as counterpoint and possible balance to “top down” initiatives. The two projects are: “All Souls Episcopal Church” and The Guardians’ Institute: Donald Harrison Museum. They are spatial narratives of resilience, cultural continuity and most importantly organic responses to the trauma of spatial dislocation and the process of re-occupation – reclaiming home.

Speakers
SR

Scott Ruff

Scott Ruff is an Associate Professor of Architecture at the Tulane University School of Architecture. Born in Buffalo, New York, Ruff, received his first professional Bachelors of Architecture degree from Cornell University (1992) and a Masters of Architecture II from Cornell University (1995). He has taught at Syracuse University and Hampton University, as an Assistant Professor and the State University of New York at Buffalo, and Cornell... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

4:00pm

The Once and Future Cloud
Limited Capacity seats available

Technological advances can, at best, be described as explosive with paradigm shifting changes arriving on a regular basis. Even diligent firms can find themselves lagging behind the curve if they aren’t careful about their attitudes and approach. In less than a decade the internet went from a novelty to a necessity and the changes continue as “the cloud” continues to envelope every aspect of professional practice.
This session will highlight some of the biggest changes and their impact on schools, students and businesses of all sizes. General trends and specific tools will be examined in the light of the knowledge that will improve their implementation. This includes a comprehension of SaaS (Software as a Service) and how even Building Information Modeling is changing in the cloud.

Speakers
avatar for joel avery

joel avery

Principal, CREATiVENESS
Joel Avery is Principal of CREATiVENESS, a unique design, technology and imaging consulting firm that has received honors in architectural design, graphic design, web design and photography. He graduated with his B. Arch from Andrews University and practiced in Philadelphia for six years before starting his own company. In 1999 his newly founded firm was recognized for its skills by garnering sixth place (out of 870 entries) in the... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

4:00pm

Affordable Housing Projects - Living Building Challenge
Limited Capacity seats available

Affordable housing projects are uniquely situated to benefit from the application of the Living Building Challenge. A recent report by the International Living Future Institute explores social, regulatory, and financial barriers to achieving the Challenge in affordable housing with an emphasis on the three most challenging Petals (Net Positive Water, Net Positive Energy and Materials). Living Buildings are designed to maximize the social, environmental, and health potential of the built environment. Bringing the benefits of net positive energy and water, healthy materials, connection to place and beauty to affordable housing communities builds resiliency in the built environment, as well as among low-income families and communities. Actionable strategies and pathways to certification in a range of climates, developed through partnership with leading affordable housing developers and practitioners, are also presented. This session takes a look at findings of the report and includes first hand sharing from three projects in North America. Participants will take away tools to apply these design tools and social justice practices to their community.

Speakers
avatar for Francis Janes

Francis Janes

JUST Program Manager, International Living Future Institute
Francis Janes is the Social Justice Program Manager at the International Living Future Institute. Francis came to the Institute with a broad range of management experience in the Information Technology, Food Service and Financial Services sectors. Most recently, he served as Vice President at Beneficial State Bank, a mission driven community bank and a pioneer in socially responsible banking practices. Having lived in Seattle, Washington since... Read More →


Friday October 16, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

5:45pm

Cocktail Hour
Limited Capacity seats available

Sponsors

7:30pm

Bros Arts Ball
Limited Capacity seats available

Join us at a Masquerade Ball at the newly renovated Joan Mitchel Artist Residency Center. Bus transportation will be provided artating at 7:00 PM and running every 30 min.

Friday October 16, 2015 7:30pm - 11:00pm
Joan Mitchell Center 2275 Bayou Rd, New Orleans, LA 70119
 
Saturday, October 17
 

8:30am

Plan for Alternative Transportation System Along Selma - Montgomery (Voting Rights Act) National Historic Trail
Limited Capacity seats available

Tuskegee University was asked to develop a plan for an alternative transportation, which would link small towns and communities, primarily in Lowndes County, Alabama to Selma and Montgomery. Adequate transportation options was identified by municipal officials and community groups, as a key component in positively impacting quality of life issues for residents, as well as economic development for the respective communities. Tuskegee architecture professors Emile Dixon and Roderick Fluker, who serve as co-directors for the project, will present the transportation plan development to date.

Speakers
avatar for Emile Dixon

Emile Dixon

Assistant Professor, Tuskegee University
Emile Dixon is an assistant professor of Architecture at Tuskegee University. He earned his Master of Architecture at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, Florida where his design thesis was: “Designing for the Forgotten: Eliminating the Stigma of Affordable Housing.” This was influenced by his study at Ball State University (BSU), in Muncie, Indiana. He later published his thesis in late summer 2015. It was... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 8:30am - 9:30am
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

8:30am

Ethics Jeopardy: Avoiding a Game Ending Move
Limited Capacity seats available

Offering an engaging and lively case study approach, this session focuses on the standards all architects are legally obliged to follow. As licensed professionals, architects run the risk of losing the right to practice if appropriate standards are not heeded. Rules of Conduct... Professional Conduct Monograph... Get to know your resources.

Speakers

Saturday October 17, 2015 8:30am - 9:30am
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

8:30am

Including Pre-Fabricated Railings in Residential & Commercial Design
Limited Capacity seats available

This course includes a discussion on the use of railings as a key element in commercial & residential design. In this course the design professional will gain an understanding of the differences between custom made railings fabricated in the traditional "onsite" method and custom-made railings which are fabricated "off-site" and are then shipped to the job site ready-to-be-installed.

Speakers
KH

Kevin Harris

Director, Sales & Marketing, AGS Stainless, Inc.
Since 2013 Kevin Harris has served as the Director of Sales & Marketing for AGS Stainless, Inc. a deck and stair railing manufacturer that specializes in building custom-made, pre-manufactured railing systems. Mr. Harris has an extensive track record in business development, marketing, communications and sales. Prior to his position with AGS Stainless, Mr. Harris co-founded 4 successful firms including 2-information technology firms, one... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 8:30am - 9:30am
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

8:30am

The Political is Personal: The role of the designer at the intersection of Social Justice and design
Limited Capacity seats available

The nature of social justice work requires vulnerability and openness, and necessitates self-reflection to produce authentic impact. This seminar will look at how designers working in social impact design stitch together the personal and the political, to produce social justice outcomes in their practices, processes and projects.

Building upon the momentum that the panelists created at Harvard GSD: inForming Justice, a conversation about the role of the design in building equitable communities, this workshop will critically engage participants to rethink the role of the designer to produce social justice outcomes and continue to elevate the field and pedagogy of architecture to include Community-engaged design.

Panelists will present case studies from their own social justice work, but lead a seminar discussion around the inclusion of race and civil rights frameworks in contemporary design practice and education, and candidly speak on collective action towards more justice in the built environment and social systems that activate our communities.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Dowdell

Kimberly Dowdell

Executive Manager, City of Detroit
Kimberly is a recent graduate of the Mid-Career Master of Public Administration program from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, where she was a Sheila C. Johnson Leadership Fellow within the Center for Public Leadership. Prior to graduate school, she worked as a licensed architect and real estate project manager in New York. A native of Detroit, Kimberly grew up with an ambition to revitalize cities using real estate... Read More →
avatar for Theresa Hwang

Theresa Hwang

Theresa Hwang is the Director of Community Design and Planning at the Skid Row Housing Trust, a non-profit permanent supportive housing organization where she was the Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow from 2009-2012. She has spent over 10 years engaged in community organizing work for equitable cultural development and community empowerment with multiple groups and campaigns in Boston and Los Angeles. She implements community organizing... Read More →
avatar for Liz Ogbu

Liz Ogbu

Founder + Principal, Studio O
Liz Ogbu is a designer, urbanist, and social innovator. From designing shelters for immigrant day laborers in the U.S. to leading a design workshop at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting, Liz has a long history of engagement in the design for social impact movement. She is Founder + Principal of Studio O, a multidisciplinary consulting practice that works with nonprofits, municipalities, and companies to tackle wicked social problems... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

8:30am

9:35am

Leveraging a Community's Cultural Capital
Limited Capacity seats available

The speaker will share his experience of assembling a team, preparing a proposal, winning the contract, and executing the conceptual design of an Artists Pathway and Visitor Center in the Watts community of Los Angeles as part of the National Endowment of the Arts "Our Town" program.

Speakers
MB

Megan Basnak

Architectural Designer and Researcher, Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center)
Megan Basnak, Associate AIA, CAPS, is an architectural designer and researcher at the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access at the University at Buffalo-SUNY. Her interests include investigating forms of architectural practice that aid typically underserved populations and understanding the impact of universal design on different user groups. Basnak’s experience includes the design of accessible home modifications... Read More →
avatar for Charles Davis

Charles Davis

Assistant Professor of Architecture History, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Charles Davis is an Assistant Professor of Architectural History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He has a PhD in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.Arch from the State University of New York at Buffalo. His scholarship investigates the hitorical integrations of race and style theory in modern architecture. His forthcoming monograph, “Building Character: the Racial Politics of Modern Architectural... Read More →
KS

Korydon Smith

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, University at Buffalo
Korydon Smith is an associate professor and associate dean in the School of Architecture and Planning at the University at Buffalo-SUNY, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in architectural design, theory, and methods. His primary research focuses on design and social justice, while a second line of scholarship investigates alternative models of design education. Dr. Smith joined the faculty at Buffalo in 2012 after serving on the... Read More →
avatar for Beth Tauke

Beth Tauke

Associate Professor - Architecture, university at Buffalo - State University of New York
Beth Tauke is an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University at Buffalo-SUNY, and project director in the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA), the leading research center on universal design in the built environment in the U.S. Her research focuses on design education and inclusive design, especially the empowerment of minority groups through design. Tauke was principal investigator of the... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 9:35am - 10:35am
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

9:35am

Of Mud and Men: Empowerment Through Participatory Architecture
Limited Capacity seats available

A clear distinction can be made between the way developed and developing countries approach physical recovery: in the developed world we seek material solutions, while in the developing world the best proven solutions are primarily social mechanisms.  Community participation in the construction process, through social organization and democratic operational action, lends itself to physical and economic recovery.  This participatory strategy begins to shape a social infrastructure that continues in a community long after the agencies, architects, and non-profits have moved out.  This unequivocal collaborative action is accompanied by a no less resolute turn toward a state of independence and self-sufficiency in the acquisition and retention of resources needed to transcend societal and political conditions of disparity. 

Using project examples from India, Mali, and Austin Texas, the presentation will define a methodology of participation that is applicable across diverse cultures and communities.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Gilmore

Mary Gilmore

Architect, Campo Architects
Mary is an architect who specializes in socially responsible, design-driven, sustainable projects. She has worked with architecture and design firms throughout the country, and has also worked independently on international design projects in India and Mali, West Africa, focusing on community participation in design. Mary is currently an architect in New Orleans, a member of the AIA New Orleans executive board, a mentor in the NOMA Project... Read More →



Saturday October 17, 2015 9:35am - 10:35am
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU HSW

10:40am

Role of Wellness in Buildings
Limited Capacity seats available

The USGBC LEED system quantifies the sustainability of the design, construction and operation of buildings. This system does not thoroughly extend into the realm of the wellness of the occupants. The new Well certification does attempt to quantify the health aspect that an individual in the space will encounter. This class will look at the intersection of energy efficiency and health from a first and operating cost standpoint. We will show various software and methodologies used to improve design and construction for efficiency and wellness. Subjects will include elements of Biophilic Design, Active Design, Well design movement, prevention of Legionnaires disease and the intersection of architecture and neuroscience. Lecture will explore the way daylight Harvesting systems can be designed using software for Spatial Daylight Autonomy, Annual Sun Exposure and Avg Annual Lux, such that it is effective, efficient and provides health benefits as described above. Building envelope systems and their interactions with the HVAC systems will also be explored for how they can be specified to yield heath benefits as well as efficiency and effectiveness goals.

Speakers
BL

Brian Lomel

Brian and his wife have lived in Ft. Lauderdale for 18 years. He is a fuzzy bee from Georgia Tech, a chef, a gardener, a runner, a mechanical engineer, and a sustainability consultant. His 25+ years of consulting engineering practice have been established in master planning, engineering/design and construction administration for MEP systems in all building types. Brian enjoys helping customers create healthy, efficient buildings. He is the past... Read More →
HT

Heather Tank

Heather has over eight years of experience in many project types including | educational facilities, commercial retailers, libraries, restaurants, city/county municipalities and | several military installations. She has designed and overseen the installation of thermal storage | systems, split systems, chiller systems and systems using rooftop units and VAV. Selected | relevant projects include: Tulane University, University of South Florida... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 10:40am - 11:40am
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

10:40am

Thinking Collaboratively: Manipulating Technology to Direct the Design Process
Limited Capacity seats available

During the presentation I will explain our design process and integration of architectural software–Ecotect, 3DMaxx, Rhino, Revit and AutoCAD–that was used to design the Museum of the Built Environment, one of eleven projects designed by FXFOWLE Architects within the King Abdullah Financial District, a new 55 million-square-foot mixed-use urban development currently under construction in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. I focused on the rational use of technology by the project’s diverse design team to advance architectural and environmental goals as well as lessons learned during the designs development.
It will illustrate thinking collaboratively works with both the members of your team as well as the softwares used.

Speakers
avatar for Pascale Sablan

Pascale Sablan

Associate, FXFOWLE Architects
Pascale Sablan AIA, NOMA, LEED, an accomplished architect and President of NYCOBA, graduated Magna Cum Laude from Pratt Institute with a Bachelor of Architecture, and completed a Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design at Columbia University. Pascale’s professional career began and was nurtured at AARRIS Architects. She devoted four years of her life and career to working on The African Burial Ground National Monument, the first... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

10:40am

“Got Grit?” - Running the Career Marathon
Limited Capacity seats available

In her 2013 TEDtalk, Angela Lee Duckworth discusses the importance of “Grit”; a personality trait in which one focuses on “passion and perseverance [in pursuit of] long term goals”. In this seminar, a panel of multi-generational staff at Perkins+Will will discuss how their personal and professional “grit” has given them the stamina to grow in their architectural careers. Please join us for a dynamic discussion on developing your career as emerging professionals, licensed architects and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Teri Canada

Teri Canada

AIA, LEED AP /Senior Project Manager, Perkins+Will
As a Senior Associate and Senior Project Manager, Teri has 19 years of experience in the architectural profession with a concentration in project management. She has worked on a wide range of projects types for both public and private clients with a focus on the design of higher educational facilities and cultural buildings. Teri's notable projects include the Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta and Historic Emancipation Park in Houston... Read More →
avatar for Vershae Hite

Vershae Hite

Arch II, Perkins+Will
Vershae joined The Freelon Group in 2012, after obtaining her Master of Architecture, Cultural Identity and Globalization from the University of Westminster in London, England. Combined with a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, she has outstanding experience on a variety of the firm's design competitions and cultural projects, including the National Museum of African American History and Culture. While... Read More →
avatar for Eugene Wright

Eugene Wright

Project Architect, Perkins+Will
As a licensed project architect, Eugene has significant experience coordinating complex teams of consultants to design, develop, and administer nearly one million square-feet of building construction. Having worked on a wide variety of projects, he has developed experience in corporate, commercial, healthcare, K-12, higher education, civic, government, and pro bono projects. Eugene is a conscientious and enthusiastic individual committed to... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 10:40am - 12:10pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

12:45pm

Merging Two Dichotomic Career Paths in Architecture: The Profession and the Professor
Limited Capacity seats available

Future of Architectural Education

In brief: Today, many minority architectural professionals are concerned about the declining number of minorities entering the profession. Over the years, the number of incoming freshmen that indicate an interest in architecture has declined. As a result, we tend to focus our energies on recruiting high school students to architecture, ARE pass rates and preparation courses, and improving corporate climates for increased diversity. However, these tactics often overlook the decline in the number of licensed professionals that elect to develop their careers through educating future architects through professorships at NAAB-accredited programs. This workshop will discuss merging two dichotomic career paths in architecture: the profession and the professor as a means to increase diversity efforts in the profession of architecture.

Speakers
DI

Daya Irene Taylor

Tuskegee University
Daya Irene Taylor is a licensed architect in the State of Florida and Associate Professor of Architecture at Tuskegee University. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies from Florida A&M University before attending Clemson University to gain a Master of Architecture. In the last decade, her career in design education has included instruction in design studio, graphic presentation, computer-aided drafting and architectural... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 12:45pm - 1:45pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

12:45pm

The Consequences of Designing for Diversity
Limited Capacity seats available

This seminar explores how the design of buildings, public space, and urban environments affects diverse members of society. Three case studies illustrate the profound, though often hidden, consequences design decisions and processes have on the total human experience: 1) two commemorative sites on the National Mall: the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, 2) the Shadow Catcher Project and Foster Burial Ground at the University of Virginia, and 3) the Fourth Plinth of London’s Trafalgar Square. The speakers not only examine how race, economic status, gender, age, and other factors influence the ways designers think, but also emphasize the importance of understanding increasingly diverse cultures and, thus, averting design that leads to discrimination, isolation, and segregation.

Discussion questions underscore ways our built environments impact underserved populations in the U.S. and, in turn, the ways these populations have impacted and can continue to influence the ways our built environments are designed. Audience participants will generate suggestions for building awareness of and empowerment in design processes, especially among those from minority groups.

Speakers
MB

Megan Basnak

Architectural Designer and Researcher, Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center)
Megan Basnak, Associate AIA, CAPS, is an architectural designer and researcher at the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access at the University at Buffalo-SUNY. Her interests include investigating forms of architectural practice that aid typically underserved populations and understanding the impact of universal design on different user groups. Basnak’s experience includes the design of accessible home modifications... Read More →
avatar for Charles Davis

Charles Davis

Assistant Professor of Architecture History, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Charles Davis is an Assistant Professor of Architectural History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He has a PhD in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.Arch from the State University of New York at Buffalo. His scholarship investigates the hitorical integrations of race and style theory in modern architecture. His forthcoming monograph, “Building Character: the Racial Politics of Modern Architectural... Read More →
KS

Korydon Smith

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, University at Buffalo
Korydon Smith is an associate professor and associate dean in the School of Architecture and Planning at the University at Buffalo-SUNY, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in architectural design, theory, and methods. His primary research focuses on design and social justice, while a second line of scholarship investigates alternative models of design education. Dr. Smith joined the faculty at Buffalo in 2012 after serving on the... Read More →
avatar for Beth Tauke

Beth Tauke

Associate Professor - Architecture, university at Buffalo - State University of New York
Beth Tauke is an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University at Buffalo-SUNY, and project director in the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDEA), the leading research center on universal design in the built environment in the U.S. Her research focuses on design education and inclusive design, especially the empowerment of minority groups through design. Tauke was principal investigator of the... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 12:45pm - 2:15pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

12:45pm

Building a Child Friendly City
Limited Capacity seats available

YOUNG PEOPLE AND PLACEMAKING: ENGAGING YOUTH TO CREATE CHILD FRIENDLY CITIES

Would a city look and function differently if kids played an integral part in envisioning and planning the city? The Child Friendly Cities Initiative developed by UNICEF in 1996 believes including youth in planning cities would increase the opportunities for youth to thrive. A lively discussion and presentation from four different organizations will highlight, how they are helping to create child friendly cities as well as the importance of developing cities which put children first.

Speakers
DG

Dawn Goodwin

English Teacher, Joseph S. Clark High School
Dawn Goodwin is a teacher at Joseph S. Clark Preparatory High School, part of FirstLine Charter Schools in New Orleans. The mission of the Firstline schools is to ensure college readiness and provide a rich variety of experiences to their students. Mrs. Goodwin is a Youth Plan Learn Action Now! (Y-PLAN) teacher where she has merged literature and planning as part of community engagement process for a real-time opportunity for informing... Read More →
avatar for Charlotte Jones

Charlotte Jones

Co-Founder, PlayBuild
Charlotte Jones, Director of Operations and Programming – Charlotte runs PlayBuild’s day-to-day operations on-site and at special events. In addition, she’s designing and delivering the PlayBuild curriculum for grade levels K-7. Charlotte joined PlayBuild from the Preservation Resource Center where she facilitated architectural and cultural heritage programming in classrooms around New Orleans. Prior to PRC she worked at Louisiana Outdoor... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 12:45pm - 2:15pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

1:50pm

Characteristics of High Performing Firms - and How to Become One
Limited Capacity seats available

Did you know that 25% of A/E firms of all sizes consistently make 20+% Operating Profit Rates and deliver 30+% Pre-Tax Returns on Equity? Moreover, there is convincing evidence that these firms are not ‘one-year-wonders’. These High Performing Firms are realizing virtually double industry-average financial results year-after-year.

Discover which specific operating & financial characteristics – Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) – these High Performing Firms have in common.

Then, investigate several identifiable practices – not all financial – High Performing Firms incorporate for consistent success and profitability:
• Strong project management habits.
• A culture of quality.
• Attention to financial issues as much a focus of leaders and managers as are design, and marketing.
• Hire for talent first, skill and experience second.
• Reinvestment of profits in training and technology.

By the end, you will be able to evaluate your own firm's operational and financial performance, and analyze practices that can be incorporated into your practice to achieve and maintain above-average success year-after-year.

Speakers
avatar for Michael (Mike) A. Webber

Michael (Mike) A. Webber

Founder/Principal, A/E Finance
After years as CFO of an A/E firm, Mike Webber started A/E Finance. He works with Principals & Owners of firms of all sizes across the country on financial analysis & benchmarking, project & practice management, strategic planning, turnarounds, and interim assignments. | | Mike also is actively involved with A/E associations. He is past Chair and a longtime member of AIA Chicago's Practice Management KC, and an AIA/ACEC Peer Reviewer... Read More →



Saturday October 17, 2015 1:50pm - 2:50pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

1:50pm

Jack + Steve Show
NOMA’s “Jack and Steve Show”
By R. Steven Lewis, NOMAC, AIA, LEED AP
February 18, 2015
Legend has it that during a NOMA Conference some years ago when one of the schedule presenters failed to show up, Jack Travis and Steve Lewis were drafted into service to fill the void. With no formal preparation, the two did what came naturally and simply set up shop in front of those in attendance and embarked on a broad ranging exploration of design, practice, and the unique challenges and opportunities confronting architects of color in today’s world. At first the banter was confined to each other, but soon the audience became actively involved. At the conclusion of the session, people were either agitated or excited, but in all cases, they clamored for more. Since that inaugural year, the two 
have presented their seminar, which has come to be known as “The Jack and Steve Show,” every year at the NOMA Conference. The seminar follows a “call and response1” format during which Lewis plays the role of provocateur, challenging his colleague Travis to make a case for a so-called “Black Aesthetic.” Over the years, Travis has continued to evolve what he calls the “Ten Principles of Black Cultural Design, which consist of the following:
ECONOMY
SIMPLICITY
EASE OF CONSTRUCTION
EASE OF MAINTENANCE
SPIRITUALITY
HERITAGE
DUALITY OR IRONY OF THE CONDITION
EARTH CENTERED / EARTH NURTURING
STRONG INDOOR / OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIP
INTENSE USE OF COLOR, PATTERN + TEXTURE
It should not be lost on the reader that Black architects are by no means a monolithic block that would subscribe to some universal set principles and/or values, but rather are as diverse a group as might be found among any defined cohort of architects. Consequently, this forum allows for the free exchange of ideas and attitudes about design and the role of the “minority” architect, as differentiated – if at all – from that of the majority culture. Because racism today is far more embedded in the structure of society than it is overtly displayed, to claim that Blacks and other minority practitioners no longer face discriminatory treatment would be symptomatic of one who suffers from the illusion of inclusion. One need look no further than the current statistics on the number of licensed Black architects. As of the date of this writing, there but 1,9562 – 324 female and 1632 male – out of more than 100,000 total licensed architects in North America.

Speakers
SL

Steven Lewis

President, Thinking Leadership
Steven Lewis is an architect and a tireless advocate for social justice and diversity within the field of architecture. In January of 2008, he returned to Southern California to join Parsons as a Design Manager after serving four years with the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of the Chief Architect in Washington, DC. Steven was a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Design for the 2006-07 academic year. He was a... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 1:50pm - 3:20pm
05 - First Floor Gallery Sheraton Hotel

2:55pm

Trending Tomorrow: An Architecture Intelligence Forecast
Limited Capacity seats available

What does the future hold for today's architects? Is traditional design giving way to cutting-edge approaches? Look into the crystal ball at "Trending Tomorrow." This session will cover the intellectual, experimental trends shaping contemporary architecture. Explore a variety of challenges impacting the future of the practice, including:

social activism and humanitarian architecture; 
concerns over climate change, resiliency, and sustainability;
ecology, biological processes, and relational systems; 
the role of new technologies in contemporary culture;
algorithmic and parametric approaches to design;
digital fabrication and the use of microcontrollers in architectural design.

Discover the intellectual trends that are shaping practices around the world that have lately become more experimental, speculative, and future-oriented than in recent decades. Learn approaches that could redefine your practice to address tomorrow's wicked problems.

Speakers
avatar for William Willoughby

William Willoughby

Associate Dean, Kent State University
William T. Willoughby, AIA is an architect, educator, and essayist. After graduating from Kent State University and beginning his career as an architect in Cleveland, he served as a visiting assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and became an architectural educator and administrator at Louisiana Tech University where he served for 15 years. He returned to Kent State University's College of Architecture and... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 2:55pm - 3:55pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

2:55pm

Preservation & Cultural Heritage Matters
Limited Capacity seats available

Discuss specific examples of historic landmark projects that were the catalyst for urban renewal & revitalization. These are buildings of significance as they authentically represent the stories and lives of people of our past. Preservation of these buildings have proven to be an economic revitalization strategy in many communities around the country. A Primer on how to negotiate the agency and historic review process to meet project goals.

Speakers
avatar for Dale Glenwood Green

Dale Glenwood Green

Assistant Professor, Morgan State University
Dale Glenwood Green is a Partner with Sulton Campbell Britt & Associates, P.C. an Architecture, Historic Preservation, Planning and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) consulting firm based in Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. Green is a Professor of Architecture and Historic Preservation, a LEED Accredited Professional, a Historical Architect in accordance with the Secretary of the Interiors Professional Qualifications (36 CFR... Read More →
RM

Ronnie McGhee

Mr. McGhee has thirty years of professional practice in architecture including fifteen years as partner-in-charge of a Washington D.C. based architectural firm, R. McGhee & Associates, specializing in sustainable architecture, urban design, interior design, historic preservation and adaptive reuse. He has designed and worked on numerous DC Landmark and US Park Service (USPS), National Register Listed properties, served on the DC Historic... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 2:55pm - 3:55pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

2:55pm

Creating Socially Just Communities: A Multicultural Center grounded in Consensus Imagination
Limited Capacity seats available

Don Mitchell talks about the fight to public space in his introduction of his book, entitled The Right to the City: Social Justice and the fight for Public Space. Social Justice addresses that virtue which guides us in creating places of human interactions for personal and social development; places where people are treated equally, irrespective of ethnic origin, gender, possessions, race, religion, etc. Community empowerment and engagement in the design process gives access for the people to create spaces of inspiration and beauty.
This 90-minute, audience-engaging experience demonstrates the “community process” utilized by Kansas State University for its Multicultural Student Center.
The need for the center grew out of the university itself not being a socially just community. The session will demonstrate how programming the needs of the community and the need for the university to adequately serve the growing multicultural student population will work together. Attendees will participate in a roundtable experience that engages them in 7 different “community” perspectives served by the new, state-of-the-art Center.

Speakers
MC

Mirta Chavez

Director-Office of Diversity, Kansas State University
Mirta Chavez, Director of Multicultural Organizations, coordinates all multicultural student organizations and their activities. She spearheaded the investigation of center case studies for the university and the initial programming of the Center. 
MG

Myra Gordon

Dr. Gordon has been the university’s chief diversity officer for 13 years. During her tenure at K-State, the university has won two national awards for diversity excellence. Her office oversees all-campus diversity programming, including the design direction of the Center.
HM

Hector Martinez

Student, Kansas State University
Hector Martinez, a fourth year Hispanic student in Architecture, has been a NOMAS member instrumental in shaping the preliminary design of the Center, and part of a core student team who promote the Center to those with power and privilege.
avatar for La Barbara James Wigfall

La Barbara James Wigfall

Professor, Kansas State University, Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning
La Barbara James Wigfall, founding KSU NOMA advisor and former University Liaison/NOMA Board, focuses on consensus imagination and community empowerment. She serves on the University committee who oversees the Center design process.
DW

Damien Williams

Damien M. Williams, development recruiter and talent manager, oversaw fundraising and established lifelong relationships through involvement and investment in the Multicultural Center. Although an Associate Vice President for Development-Regis University, he remains committed to assisting the facilitation of multicultural programs and services through the design and development of the Center.


Saturday October 17, 2015 2:55pm - 4:25pm
01 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

4:00pm

Ways to create more opportunities for minority architects in multi-family affordable housing development
Limited Capacity seats available

The presentation will focus on various opportunities for minority architects to get involved in affordable housing to include:

Working with Housing Authorities (HUD RAD Program);
Working with local government;
Working on Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Projects;
Opportunities to partner with contractors and form development companies;
Master Planning on large Housing Authority developments;
Owners Rep opportunities;

Speakers
GH

Glenn Hudson

Principal, Hudson Real Estate Advisory Group
Glenn Hudson has over 30 years of community, economic development and lending experience. Mr. Hudson serves as principal owner of the Hudson Real Estate Advisory Group, in which he serves as a consultant and advisor structuring deals with local government entities, housing authorities, universities, faith-based organizations, non-profit and for-profit organizations. Prior to forming the Hudson Real Estate Advisory Group, LLC, Mr. Hudson spent... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
03 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1
  • HSW/LU LU

4:00pm

JUST and Employee Engagement
Limited Capacity seats available

In this seminar, participants will explore how organizational investments in diversity, equity, employee benefits, and community stewardship can improve productivity and financial performance. Participants will gain an understanding of the International Living Future Institute's Social Justice Program (JUST) and how this corporate transparency platform and disclosure tool can help business leaders shape a robust and powerful talent management program. This session will conclude with case studies of how socially just and responsible organizations have been able to achieve consistently high employee engagement scores and industry leading financial returns.

Speakers
avatar for Francis Janes

Francis Janes

JUST Program Manager, International Living Future Institute
Francis Janes is the Social Justice Program Manager at the International Living Future Institute. Francis came to the Institute with a broad range of management experience in the Information Technology, Food Service and Financial Services sectors. Most recently, he served as Vice President at Beneficial State Bank, a mission driven community bank and a pioneer in socially responsible banking practices. Having lived in Seattle, Washington since... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 4:00pm - 5:30pm
02 - Rhythms Sheraton Hotel
  • CEU Hours 1.5
  • HSW/LU LU

6:30pm

Awards Dinner Keynote - Maurice Cox
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Maurice Cox

Maurice Cox

Planning Director, City of Detroit
Maurice Cox is a nationally respected architectural educator, community designer and a leader in the public interest design movement. Most recently Cox was appointed to the role of Planning Director for the City of Detroit charged with the responsibility of guiding the urban design and revitalization of one of America’s most significant legacy cities. Cox was the Associate Dean for Community Engagement at the Tulane University School of... Read More →


Saturday October 17, 2015 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Armstrong Ballroom Sheraton Hotel

9:30pm

NOMA Closeout
Limited Capacity seats available

Saturday October 17, 2015 9:30pm - 10:30pm
Armstrong Ballroom Sheraton Hotel